Posts Tagged "kale"

Broccoli, Kohlrabi, and Kale Salad

This is spring/early summer in a bowl. It’s crunchy, it’s creamy, it’s kind of like a slaw but also kind of like a salad. And it’s all farmers’ market veggies.

And as you may know from my past posts, when it comes to salads, I don’t measure. How much of each vegetable is up to you. Here’s what I used:

Broccoli, chopped
Kohlrabi, peeled and diced
Micro Kale
Nappa Cabbage, chopped
Red Onion, finely chopped

salad2

And as for the dressing, this is the approximate measurements:

1 cub of Greek yogurt
1-2 teaspoons mayo (optional)
1 garlic clove, minced or garlic powder
parprika
celery seed
salt and pepper

Mix the dressing in the bowl first and then toss with the veggies. If you want it to be vegan, just make an olive oil and vinegar dressing instead of the yogurt dressing.

salad

 

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Kale Chips

I’m obsessed with kale chips. It is, by far, my favorite way to eat kale. When I pull the pan out of the oven, the chips are gone in no time. I can’t get enough of them. Pictured below is some gorgeous kale that I got from Northridge Organic Farm at the Worthington Farmers’ Market.

Kaleraw

 

The Method:

Start with either curly leaf kale or Italian kale (also known as Lacinato or dinosaur kale. And who doesn’t like the name dinosaur kale?). Remove the tough center stem and tear the leaves into large pieces.

Important: Make sure the kale is completely dry! Wet leaves will not crisp in the oven.

Drizzle the kale with olive oil and use your fingers to rub the oil over each leaf. This allows the kale to crisp evenly. (A step I only learned about recently, and though it’s tempting to skip it, it really does make a difference.)

Sprinkle with kosher or sea salt. I also like to add a few grinds of pepper, though I don’t often see that in other recipes.

Stick the kale in a 350 degree oven and bake for 8-10 minutes. Be sure to check it after 8 minutes. Kale goes from crisp to burnt very quickly, and I find that each bunch of kale I purchase cooks at a different time. The dinosaur kale, in particular, seems to crisp faster than the curly leaf kale.

When it comes out of the oven, try not to eat the entire pan of kale in a few seconds. I usually fail at this.

Finished product:

kalechips

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Kale Pesto

kale pesto pasta

I love basil pesto during the summer but never, until recently, thought of trying other types of pestos during the winter. This recipe is based off one I found in Andrew Weil’s cookbook, True Food (which, if you haven’t seen yet, I highly recommend). I made some modifications. He uses pine nuts, which is traditional in pesto but expensive. Instead I used cashews. He also uses black kale, which I didn’t have. Instead I did a mixture of green kale and spinach, both of which I had on hand and needed to use. My modified recipe looked something like this:

4-5 cups of kale and spinach (though simply kale would be wonderful as well)

1/2 cup of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

1/4-1/2 cup of extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup of cashews

1 clove of garlic, chopped

salt and pepper, to taste

red pepper flakes, to taste

Andrew Weil boils the kale for 3 minutes and then transfers it to an ice bath for an additional 3 minutes before draining it and squeezing out the water. I did this as well, though I suppose if you wanted to use raw kale, it would work. Otherwise, it’s a simple matter of putting all of the above ingredients in a food processor and pureeing until smooth.

Though this pesto could be used for so many things, my favorite way to eat pesto is on pasta. In the above photo you can see that I used pappardelle noodles, which are one of my favorites. No, in this case they are not homemade (though I love making pappardelle).  These noodles I bought frozen at Carfagna’s store. And if you live in Central Ohio and have never been to Carfagna’s then, well, you’re really missing out. Even I can’t make my own ravioli and pasta all the time, so Carfagna’s is my go to for frozen pasta.

To make the dish complete, toss the pasta and pesto with any seasonal sauteed or roasted vegetable(s) you have on hand. Eat. Savor. Enjoy.

 

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Broccoli Kale Salad

broccoli kale

I love salads, but I sometimes get bored with the average romaine lettuce salad. My solution: remove the lettuce and focus on other vegetables. This particular salad is nice for the winter months when fresh, local lettuce is not available. The main focus is the broccoli, which is a winter vegetable.  And a warning to all: I mentioned once before that I don’t always measure. Well, I never measure when making a salad. So here are the ingredients I used:

Broccoli, chopped in small pieces

Carrots, shredded

Kale (any kind), finely chopped in a food processor until it looks like small pieces of parsley

Red Onion, diced

Walnuts, chopped in small pieces

How much of each one is really a personal preference. The bulk of the salad should be the broccoli. Raw kale can be tough and hard to chew, so finely chopping it in a food processor is key.

As for the dressing, if you want to make this vegan, just add some olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper. Sometimes I want a creamy dressing, so I make a Greek yogurt dressing:

about 1/2 cup of Greek Yogurt

1 teaspoon Stone Ground Mustard (read the label! Not all stone ground mustards are equal. Look for one that doesn’t have artificial flavors. It should simply be distilled vinegar, water, mustard seed, salt and spices (or something similar)).

1 teaspoon Mayonnaise (optional. Make sure it’s good quality.)

a couple splashes of Apple Cider Vinegar (add a little bit at a time and keep tasting until the acidity level is where you want it to be)

And then, to taste:

Garlic Powder 

Celery Seed

Salt and Pepper

Paprika

And there ya go! A hearty, wonderful salad to help you get through the day. Experiment, make it your own. Enjoy.

 

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