Posts Tagged "potatoes"

Warm Potato Salad with Mustard and Dill

I love potato salad in all of its glorious forms. I grew up eating two different kinds of potato salads: the typical midwest version that’s covered in mayo and has hard boiled eggs mixed in (and sometimes bacon), and also my great-grandmother’s Italian version, which has an olive oil-based dressing, bacon, and chives.  Though I love both, in recent years, I discovered another one that I love just as well. The one I will describe below I consider to be more of a French-style potato salad. It’s wonderful warm but can be served chilled as well. And the farmers’ market has wonderful red-skinned potatoes right now, so it’s a perfect time to make this salad.

Potato

Start by boiling:

1 pound of red skinned potatoes, scrubbed clean and quartered

Boil them in enough water so that they’re covered by about an inch of water. Don’t boil them in too much water, for they’ll loose their flavor. And don’t forget to salt the water.

In the meantime, select a bowl large enough to not only hold all of the potatoes, but also one that has room enough for you to stir the potatoes without making a mess all over the counter. In the bottom of the bowl, whisk together:

1 heaping tablespoon of Dijon mustard
about 3 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil
a handful of fresh dill, chopped*
a dash of paprika
salt and pepper

Once the potatoes are fork tender, drain them and then add them directly to the bowl with the mustard dressing. Toss the potatoes with the dressing. Since they are steaming hot, the potatoes will absorb the mustard and create a wonderful fragrance. While they are still steaming hot, add:

a few splashes of vinegar (champagne, red-wine, and apple cider all work well)

Also add more olive oil, if need be, and taste to see if they need more salt, pepper or mustard.

Serve while it’s still warm.

*The dill in the above photo is from my little apartment balcony herb garden. That’s the wonderful thing about herbs. You don’t need a lot of space to grow them, and one plant will give you wonderful herbs all summer.

 

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Leek and Potato Soup

The key to any soup is simplicity. Just a few ingredients and homemade broth can make an amazing bowl of comfort. This soup is a perfect example.

Potato soup has always been one of my favorite comfort foods. Leeks are more of a winter/fall vegetable, but I found some late spring ones at the market, so why not use them?

**Please note that this particular recipe doesn’t make a lot of soup, just enough for about 2 servings. Double it if you are cooking for more than two people.

leek soup

The recipe:

Start by heating olive oil in a large pot over medium-low heat. Then add:
2-3 leeks, sliced
1 small yellow onion, sliced
A splash of vegetable broth
Salt

Let cook for about 15 minutes, until onions are nice and tender. Then add:
4-5 small gold potatoes or 2 large white potatoes, quartered.
(I love the texture of the gold potatoes. They make the soup silky, but use whatever you have.)

Let cook for a minute or two, then add:
4 cups of homemade vegetable broth

Let simmer for about 15 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Add:
a few sprigs of fresh dill (optional, but you should do it. It’s wonderful!)
a splash or two of cream or half and half (also optional)

Puree the soup and serve with chives, fresh ground pepper and croutons or crusty bread on top.

leek soup2

**Another note: My soup has a slight orange tinge this time because I used a homemade broth that had tomato in it. Depending on the type of broth you use, it may appear white-ish, so don’t panic if your soup doesn’t look like mine!

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Pulled Pork Shepherd’s Pie

pie

My version of meat and potatoes. For those of you who think that I don’t eat meat, here ya go. When I do eat meat, I go all the way.

The inspiration for this dish came from one of those shows on the Cooking Channel that features dishes from various restaurants across the nation. I have no idea which restaurant it was that gave me this idea, but I simply had to try it myself. Pulled pork and mashed potatoes are two of my favorite things.

The pork came from Cedar Cress Farm at the Worthington Farmers’ Market. I used pork shoulder (about 3 lbs). I prepared mine in a crock pot because I was going to be in and out of the house during the day. If you can cook it in the oven all day, that’s the best way to do it, but a crock pot works as well.

Once again, this really isn’t an exact recipe but, if you’ve read my previous posts, I suppose you’re used to that by now.

Start by heating olive oil in a saute pan at medium-medium high heat. Smother the pork in salt and pepper and sear it until each side is brown. (Note that if you’re cooking it in the oven, you should sear it in the same pan you’re going to use to roast the pork so that all the flavors can remain in the same pot). Once the pork is seared, move it to the crock pot (if using one). Then pour a few splashes of red wine into the saute pan in order to get all of those good, flavorful brown bits off the bottom of the pan. After cooking for a minute, pour that wine over the pork in the crock pot. Add some water (a couple cups) and then let the pork cook all day. (I started my crock pot on high just to get the heat up and then, after about an hour, turned it down to low.) When it’s done, it’ll be falling apart. Once it’s cool enough to touch, shred it using two forks.

While the pork cools, heat a tablespoon of butter in a saute pan over medium heat. Once melted, add a tablespoon of flour and whisk it together. Now add a few splashes of red wine and about a 1/2 cup of the water/wine mixture that cooked with the pork (this is optional. It’s fatty from cooking with the pork but has wonderful flavor. If you don’t want it, just use all chicken stock). I also added a few ladles of homemade chicken stock (eyeball how much you need, based on how much pork you made). Once the mixture thickens, season it with a little more salt and pepper (taste it first!).  If it doesn’t appear thick enough, whisk in about a teaspoon of arrowroot flour to thicken it even more (this step may not be necessary depending on how much liquid you added in the beginning. Just be sure to use a flour, such as arrowroot, that can easily be whisked into the liquid. It helps to lower the heat and mix the arrowroot flour with a touch of water first before adding it into the hot liquid). Add the shredded pork and stir until well combined. Add more chicken stock if you think it needs more liquid.

(Note that if you cooked the pork in the oven all day, you should do the above step in the same pan you cooked the pork in so that you can get all that good flavor from the bottom of the pan.)

Now the fun part: assembling the pie. Simply pour the pork mixture into a heavy pot or dutch oven and top it with homemade mashed potatoes. Dot the top of the potatoes with tiny cubes of butter and bake it in a 400 degree oven for 10 minutes. Once it is bubbly hot, stick it under the broiler to get the top nice and brown. Then enjoy the best meat and potato dish you’ll ever eat.

 

 

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